Texting Acronyms Every Parent Should Know

Texting Acronyms Every Parent Should Know

June is Internet Safety Month! StaySafeOnline.org is urging families and kids to STOP.THINK.CONNECT. and stay safe while being online. One way we can help our kids stay safe online is by getting up to speed with texting. Texting is a new language our kids speak fluently; we better get on board…fast. Once you think you know all the texting acronyms, more show up!

I consider myself a tech savvy mom and am usually ahead of the curve with new technology and apps, but even I was caught off guard when a teacher accused my son of writing (not even texting!) KYS on worksheets. I couldn’t figure out why she was so upset only to find out later that it was short for “Kill Yourself”. This same teacher also admitted she had to ask another student what it meant. Thankfully my son was cleared of writing this acronym, but it made me realize that even I needed to do a bit more studying on popular texting acronyms.

Here are some of the most commonly used texting acronyms, also used for chat, social media commenting and more:

53X – sex
8 – can mean ate or refers to oral sex
420 – marijuana
9 or CD9 – parents are nearby/around
99 – parents are gone
ADR – address
ASL – age/sex/location
B2K or BTK – Back to Keyboard
F2F – face to face / facetime
GNOC – get naked on camera
GYPO – get your pants off
IWSN – I want sex now
J/O – jerking off
KFY or K4Y – kiss for you
KPC – keep parents clueless
KYS – kill yourself
LMIRL – lets meet in real life
MOS – mom over shoulder
MPFB – my personal f*** buddy
P911 – parent alert
PAL – parents are listening (sometimes peace and love)
PAW – parents are watching
POS – parents over shoulder or piece of sh**
pron – porn
S2R – send to receive
WYRN – what’s your real name

There are hundreds, if not thousands, more texting acronyms used each day. If you are monitoring your child’s devices for chats or texting, you can easily do an internet search to find the most likely meaning behind their abbreviations. NetLingo offers a comprehensive list of chat acronyms and texting shorthand. Texting isn’t the only place you’ll see these used; oftentimes you will find shorthand in comments throughout social media and direct messaging in apps like Snapchat, Instagram, and more.

Take time this month to teach your kids the value of online safety and how to be safe in their electronic social world! ConnectSafely.org offers some great social web tips for teens such as:

  • Be your own person.
  • Be nice online.
  • Think about your post.
  • Don’t talk about sex with strangers.
  • Avoid in-person meetings.

To read more about these tips and online safety, visit ConnectSafely.org.

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