NY Full Sour Dill Cucumber Pickles Recipe

All of this talk about pickles (here and here), and I haven’t even shared the recipe

You see, it’s not mine to share.

It’s from a great pickling book, The Joy of Pickling (aptly titled). Other great pickling books are Nourishing Traditions and Wild Fermentation.

However, I just gave my friend a pickle from this batch and she asked for the dill pickles recipe. And I was going to give it to her, but thought posting it here would be similar to my sharing it with her…

Oh, and I just watched a Good Eats from Alton Brown about pickles so I may try some of his tricks next time; namely, using filtered water whenever it calls for water, and making sure to trim the end of the cucumber where it was attached to the plant.

Lower East Side Full-Sour Dills (from The Joy of Pickling) by Linda Ziedrich. Harvard Common Press, 2009.

  • 4 lb pickling cucumbers, blossom ends removed
  • 4-6 dill heads
  • 2 small peppers, slit lengthwise (note to my friend- I didn’t add these this time)
  • 8 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 T whole allspice
  • 1 t whole black peppercorns
  • 2 T whole coriander seeds
  • 1/2 c pickling salt
  • 3 qt. water

Layer cucumbers in a gallon jar with everything but the salt. Dissolve the salt in the water, and pour enough brine over the cucumbers to cover them.

Put a gallon-size freezer bag into the jar, pour the remaining brine into the bag, and seal the bag. Keep the jar at room temperature.

Within 3 days you should see tiny bubbles in the brine. If scum forms on top of the brine, skim off daily and rinse the brine bag.

The pickles should be ready in about 2 weeks (note to my friend- I let mine go about 10 days but it was fairly hot- like 75 degrees inside- during that time). They are ready when they are olive green and sour. At this point, remove the brine bag and any scum, seal the jar, and store it in the refrigerator, where they will keep for several months or longer. Hope you enjoy this dill pickles recipe as much as I do!

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